Determining Your Life Insurance Premium

When you’re purchasing life insurance, you don’t have much say about your insurance premium. It’s decided by the company and your only decision is whether or not to accept their offer.

However, there are some known factors that go into determining the premium. While you can’t control some of them, it will help you fill out your application and talk to the company intelligently if you know what they’re looking for.

Factors You Can’t Control

Age is a primary factor the helps determine your life insurance premium. Younger people will have the best premiums, as older people have a higher risk of dying.

Gender also contributes to your premium. Women usually go to the doctor more often than men, so they catch dangerous conditions earlier, and they typically live longer, so they will pay less for insurance.

Your health history also goes a long way when a insurance company is figuring out your premium. Any diseases you’ve had or have currently, as well as your family history of disease, are all contributing factors. It may be tempting to stretch the truth about your health history when applying for insurance. Doing this, however, puts you at risk for policy cancellation if the company finds out.

Showing that you have recovered from a life-threatening or serious condition, like cancer, or that you are taking care of something chronic, like diabetes, can help lower your premium, depending on the company and type of insurance you’re applying for.

The insurance company will also want to know if you have anything in your past that indicates you might engaged in risky behavior. This includes anything from bankruptcy filings to mental illness. Any risk you’ve demonstrated in the past will cause you to pay higher premiums.

Factors You Can Control

If you’re a smoker, you will pay more for insurance than a non-smoker. Note that this normally pertains to people who smoke regularly and not to those who smoke cigars or pipe tobacco occasionally with their friends.

In addition, your general physical condition, especially your weight, contributes to your life insurance premium. If you are over or under weight for your height, you will pay more. Those with a low-average weight will have the best premium.

What you do for a living and what you do for fun also help determine your premium. If your job is dangerous or you have potentially lethal hobbies (like extreme sports) you will pay more for your life insurance than an accountant who likes to read.

Finally, the amount of foreign travel, as well as the places you’ve travelled to and how long you’ve stayed there, also influence your life insurance premium. If you travel frequently and spend a lot of time overseas, your life insurance will cost more.

Purchasing Life Insurance

Hopefully, knowing these factors will help you as you seek the life insurance and life insurance premium that is right for you, your family, and your circumstances. If you have questions about how your particular insurance company handles one of the issues mentioned above, be sure to ask about it before you purchase the insurance.

The Role of the Commercial Insurance Broker

Business come in all sizes, and the role of the Commercial Insurance Broker will vary in some respects with the size of the client company and the amount of insurance expertise it has available among its own staff.

The approach to commercial insurance of a small engineering workshop in a side-street will not be the same as that of a huge multi-national corporation which may number an insurance company among its subsidiaries. The essentials of the broker’s task will be the same, however, for the largest company as it is for the individual: to use his knowledge of insurance and of the insurance market to help his client to arrange a sound insurance programme which, to the maximum extent possible, meets the client’s particular needs.

The Business Insurance Broker will handle the insurances of a small company in a manner very similar to those of an individual. The relationship is likely to be a personal one wit the directors of the business, and they can be considered, in a way, as individuals who have a different, and more extended, set of insurance needs because of their involvement with the company.

The first essential will be for the insurance broker to ensure that his clients have the compulsory commercial insurances which they need for their business to be carried on legally.

Employer’s liability cover to protect the workforce must be arranged, and motor insurance is also likely to be a necessity. If the business has plant or machinery which must have a periodical statutory inspection, it will be usual to arrange for this to be done by a specialist engineering insurer under the terms of an engineering inspection contract, with or without insurance.

Fire insurance will be very important, as will consequential loss insurance to protect the firm against loss of earnings during the period following a fire until it is fully back in business. Then there will be all the other insurances which a business needs – public and products liability, theft and money insurance, goods in transit and perhaps marine insurance, all-risks covers, fidelity guarantee and possibly others. The broker may also be asked to provide insurance covers for staff, a group life and pensions scheme, or personal accident or permanent health insurance for example.

The range of insurance which may be needed, and the variety of problems which may be associated with them, place great demands on the broker with an industrial firm as his client, and make it much less possible for him to be a specialist in one or two types of insurance only. The individual may be happy to consult a broker for life or motor insurance only, but the industrial company is likely to want a single source of advice for all its insurance problems.

The larger the client company is, the less it will be interested in buying standardised commercial insurance covers or packages designed for small business insurance, and the more it will want policies which match its own specific needs. This calls for a very deep understanding of the client’s business on the part of the broker, matched by creativity in designing insurance solutions to the problems posed. The Commercial Insurance Broker’s negotiating skills may also be called upon to persuade an insurer to accept what may be an entirely new approach to a particular insurance need.

The problems of a small spread of risk may be overcome because the company is large enough to be rated on its own past record rather than as a member of a trade which is rated as a class in an SME business insurance package. When it reaches this size, a company may be interested in extensive self-insurance, and these days it is part of the broker’s role to help such clients develop appropriate self-insurance plans and to advise on risk management measures to ensure that the risk that is being retained is reduced as far as is economically possible.

Learning About Life Insurance Plans

For most individuals who opt for a life insurance plan, it is an integral part of making sure they have some financial security in their lives. Insurance is one of the most widely used security tools on the market. The premiums that these individuals have to pay towards these insurance plans are based on a number of factors. They often include the following factors:

1. Gender of the individual
2. Age of the individual
3. Hobbies of the individual
4. Quality of life of the individual
5. Profession of the individual
6. Medical history of the life assured etc.

Hundreds of people all over the world benefit from different insurance plans. Individuals who belong to various age groups and different walks of life will probably buy life insurance at some point during their lives. The various groups that buy insurance fall under these groups:

a) Single parents
b) Couples married or unmarried with a mortgage or other debts
c) Couples married or unmarried with children
d) Single people with a mortgage or debts etc.

Some of the different kinds of insurance are:

1. Variable life – Individuals can select from a wide range of investment products long with stock funds.

2. Term insurance – This insurance policy includes buying coverage for a particular tenure and for a specific amount. If the individual who has bought this plan dies during the insurance tenure, the beneficiary will receive the value of the policy. This type of investment does not include any investment coupon. The term insurance is the simplest form of the different insurance types available to individuals.

3. Universal life – Individuals who opt for this insurance policy get to decide how much the premium should be. The insurance company selects the investment option for the individuals, which might include bonds or mortgages. The amount of investment along with the return on the investment is deposited in a cash value account. The type of universal life insurance where an individual can select his or her own investment tools is known as a universal variable life plan.

4. Whole life insurance – This type of insurance plan is more or less like the term insurance plan. The only difference is that of the tenure. Due to the prolonged tenure, the premiums remain stable throughout the duration of the policy.

There are many benefits for opting for different types of life insurance plans. These advantages include:

a) The insurance policies secure the future of the spouse and children.
b) These plans can be used to pay for estate taxes and other settlement amounts.
c) The cash value policies are tax deferred, which means individuals will not be required to pay tax against this amount until the time they withdraw funds from the policy.